Display Jupyter Notebooks with Academic

Learn how to blog in Academic using Jupyter notebooks

from IPython.core.display import Image
Image('https://www.python.org/static/community_logos/python-logo-master-v3-TM-flattened.png')

png

print("Welcome to Academic!")
Welcome to Academic!

Install Python and JupyterLab

Install Anaconda which includes Python 3 and JupyterLab.

Alternatively, install JupyterLab with pip3 install jupyterlab.

Create or upload a Jupyter notebook

Run the following commands in your Terminal, substituting <MY-WEBSITE-FOLDER> and <SHORT-POST-TITLE> with the file path to your Academic website folder and a short title for your blog post (use hyphens instead of spaces), respectively:

mkdir -p <MY-WEBSITE-FOLDER>/content/post/<SHORT-POST-TITLE>/
cd <MY-WEBSITE-FOLDER>/content/post/<SHORT-POST-TITLE>/
jupyter lab index.ipynb

The jupyter command above will launch the JupyterLab editor, allowing us to add Academic metadata and write the content.

Edit your post metadata

The first cell of your Jupter notebook will contain your post metadata ( front matter).

In Jupter, choose Markdown as the type of the first cell and wrap your Academic metadata in three dashes, indicating that it is YAML front matter:

---
title: My post's title
date: 2019-09-01

# Put any other Academic metadata here...
---

Edit the metadata of your post, using the documentation as a guide to the available options.

To set a featured image, place an image named featured into your post’s folder.

For other tips, such as using math, see the guide on writing content with Academic.

Convert notebook to Markdown

jupyter nbconvert index.ipynb --to markdown --NbConvertApp.output_files_dir=.

Example

This post was created with Jupyter. The orginal files can be found at https://github.com/gcushen/hugo-academic/tree/master/exampleSite/content/post/jupyter

Thomas A. Püschel
Thomas A. Püschel
Leverhulme Early Career Fellow

I am a palaeoprimatologist and vertebrate palaeobiologist mainly focused on primate and mammalian evolution. My main interest is to study organismal evolution by reconstructing and comparing the palaeobiology of fossils to their living ecological relatives. In order to do this, I apply a combination of predictive modelling, 3D morphometrics, virtual biomechanical techniques, computational simulations, phylogenetic comparative methods, and fieldwork. I am currently collaborating on a diversity of projects that can be placed in the interface between biological anthropology, palaeontology, ecology and evolutionary biology, using cutting-edge informatic techniques. My Leverhulme Project has taken me to Gorongosa National Park, Mozambique, where I work together with the Paleo-Primate Project Gorongosa.